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Quotes from News articles about daycare: 2010, p1

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News Articles: 2010 pages: 1 |

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News Articles

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The great nursery debate
by Amelia Gentleman, The Guardian (Britain)
1 October 2010
Some, such as the child psychologist and Guardian columnist Oliver James, use the evidence to consolidate a strongly held belief that nursery care is not appropriate. His position on putting small babies into daycare is clear. "My advice would be: Don't do it."
"There is no evidence that daycare is advantageous to children from middle-class families," he writes in his most recent book, How Not To F*** Them Up, "and there is considerable evidence that it increases the risk of dysregulated cortisol levels, aggression, disobedience and emotional insecurity, especially if the care is of low quality. Unfortunately, this latter is the norm..."
He continues: "There is now overwhelming evidence that daycare causes children to have abnormal cortisol levels, probably increasing the risk of behavioural problems like aggression, fearfulness and hyperactivity."
"If daycare is as distressing to under-threes as many researchers believe, it would not be surprising if it affected their cortisol levels: when distressed we usually secrete the hormone."

Category = Behavior, Development
The great nursery debate
by Amelia Gentleman, The Guardian (Britain)
1 October 2010
(British Child Psychologist and Columnist) James no longer really dances around his conviction that babies are best at home with their mother, or possibly their father; if that is not possible, he offers a hierarchy of substitution that runs: "Daddy is better than Granny is better than Nanny is better than Minder is better than daycare." In earlier books, he says he was at pains to avoid the controversy that surrounds this issue, and stressed that if mothers felt depressed by staying at home, then childcare might be a better option. In How Not to F*** Them Up, he devotes a chapter to the subject, highlighting in detail his concerns about nurseries for babies. "Let's stop lying about this and pretending it doesn't exist as a problem... it really does. How are mothers going to make good decisions, if nobody is warning them about the real situation?" he says.
Category = Behavior, Development
The great nursery debate
by Amelia Gentleman, The Guardian (Britain)
1 October 2010
Sue Gerhardt, the author of Why Love Matters and The Selfish Society, also writes about the effects of cortisol, but is critical of nursery care for broader reasons. She sees them as concepts favoured by parents, for their convenience, reliability and cost, but not geared towards the needs of children.
"I have a lot of clients who say that they are putting their baby into nursery because it needs stimulation, and actually that is just not true," she says.
"What happens at nurseries is you have the kind of relationship that you have at a party. You meet someone, you do small talk, you might find it pleasant or it might not be. That person isn't really tuned into you. Then you move on to the next person. It is not really a relationship where someone is tuned into you. At nurseries, the turnover is so great that it is very difficult to achieve that kind of relationship," she says.
"More and more people are being given the idea that nurseries are fine for children of any age and that is not the case. It's just about money and convenience."
Category = Behavior, Development, Economics, Politics
The great nursery debate
by Amelia Gentleman, The Guardian (Britain)
1 October 2010
Penelope Leach's work on childcare has been read by parents for decades. She, too, is concerned by the emerging research on cortisol and is sceptical of governments' preference for nurseries, arguing that they tend to be attracted by economies of scale.
Category = Behavior, Development, Economics, Politics

 

Quotes from News articles about daycare: 2010, p1

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Last updated:  12/03/2011

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