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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2011-2012, p2

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Featured Books 2011-2012:  
Doing Time:What It Really Means To Grow Up In Daycare pages:  1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |

 

 
Books from: 1970  |  1980-1984  |  1985-1989 |  1990-1994  |  1995-1999  |  2000-2002  |  2003-2004  | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 | 2011-2012 |

Book

Quote/Comment

Doing Time: What It Really Means To Grow Up In Daycare
by May Saubier, ©2012
A child’s misery at daycare is not limited to the onset of beginning their new routine. Nor is it limited to the first ten minutes of the day upon being left. Children are continually crying in daycare because there is often no one available to pick them up when they fall, wipe their noses when they have a cold, kindly show them that hitting and biting is wrong, or tenderly change their diapers.
Category = Behavior, Caregiver
Doing Time: What It Really Means To Grow Up In Daycare
by May Saubier, ©2012
Chapter 3 - LONG DAYS of HARD WORK
Children spend more time in daycare than their parents spend sitting at their desks at work. When parents are alone in their cars commuting to work, their children are already one of many children in daycare. When parents leave their work for a coffee break, their children cannot leave daycare. When parents sit in lunchrooms and restaurants or quietly in their offices, their children are still at daycare.
Daycare is Hard Work A full day of “school” is incredibly long. It is so long, in fact, that employees are not capable of working the entire time the center is operational. Most centers are open from at least seven in the morning until six o’clock at night and many are open longer. Fifty-five hours a week is too long to ask an employee to be on the job, and yet, some parents do not consider this too long to leave their children.

Category = Caregiver, Politics
Doing Time: What It Really Means To Grow Up In Daycare
by May Saubier, ©2012
We often hear of “quality-time” versus “quantity-time” from daycare advocates. I do not believe there is much quality-time to be had after putting in an eight to ten hour day at the office or daycare. Parents are too tired and children are as well. Not only did the parents work all day, now they must complete all of the tasks that were not accomplished while at work. The children must go to the grocery store when they are exhausted and starved for attention. Upon arriving at home, parents have to worry about paying the bills, making dinner, doing the dishes, placing phone calls, making sure there are clean clothes for the following day, etc.
Category = Behavior, Caregiver
Doing Time: What It Really Means To Grow Up In Daycare
by May Saubier, ©2012
Chapter 4 – SIBLINGS
When children grow up in daycare, they are raised five days a week without their siblings. In order to manage the varying needs of daycare children, they are almost always divided into age groups. These different groups of children are housed in separate rooms...
This means that... a baby entering daycare may be separated each day from his siblings until dinnertime. This is a fact that is rarely mentioned when discussing the pros and cons of daycare.

Category = Caregiver, Politics, Quality
Doing Time: What It Really Means To Grow Up In Daycare
by May Saubier, ©2012
When the great daycare debate is discussed, people always focus on how children are separated from their parents at a young age. I have never heard the point addressed that children also ... are denied the ability to play, comfort or even disagree and argue with their brothers and sisters five days a week. They do not nap together, eat together, or even talk together from early in the morning until close to their bedtimes.
Category = Caregiver, Politics, Quality
Doing Time: What It Really Means To Grow Up In Daycare
by May Saubier, ©2012
Chapter 5 - THE SOCIALIZATION MYTH
Perhaps the weakest excuse for the promotion of daycare is socialization. How often have we heard it said that daycare is beneficial because it provides an opportunity for babies and child to “socialize”? First of all, babies do not really socialize with one another. They do need love, cuddling, kisses, hugs, intimate feedings, and tons of one-on-one interaction with their parents but they do not yearn to spend their days lying about on a rug with other infants.
Babies are negatively affected by being placed in a 40-hour week social situation because they are not developmentally ready. My experiences with toddlers and two-year-olds are equally negative in terms of socialization.
I have witnessed much more hitting, biting, crying, and arguing amongst these youngsters than I have sharing, playing, taking turns, etc. Socializing in daycare fosters aggressive behavior simply because children are forced to go into survival mode once deposited among so many other children who are at a self-centered, “me” stage developmentally.

Category = Behavior, Caregiver, Danger
Doing Time: What It Really Means To Grow Up In Daycare
by May Saubier, ©2012
Survival
Children often need to work hard to “survive” emotionally and physically in daycare.
Inevitably, children will snatch toys away from one another throughout the day. As a daycare child, if you want to play with a toy for any period of time, you must fight for it.

Category = Behavior, Caregiver

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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2011-2012, p2

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Last updated:  07/08/2012

Books:  1970 | 1980-1984 | 1985-1989 | 1990-1994 | 1995-1999 | 2000-2002 | 2003-2004 | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 | 2011-2012


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