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Quotes from books about daycare - 1995-99, p17

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Featured Books 1995-1999:  
Mother in the Middle     pages:  1 | 2 | 3 | 4  | 5 | 6 
Being There:  The Benefits of a Stay at Home Parent  pages:   7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 
Who Needs Parents?         pages:  11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22
Early Childcare:  Infants and Nations at Risk   pages:  23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34
Children's Interests/Mothers' Rights   pages:  35
Saving Childhood  pages:  35
Books from: 1970  |  1980-1984  |  1985-1989 |  1990-1994  |  1995-1999  |  2000-2002  |  2003-2004  |  2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 |

Book

Quote/Comment

Who Needs Parents?
The Effects of Childcare and Early Education on Children in Britain and the USA, by Patricia Morgan, October 1996, p 51
Because a centre's day has to be longer than the normal working day to allow for parental commuting, the use of shifts automatically doubles the number of people dealing with a child. Holidays, sickness, in-service training and courses all increase the number of strangers, who are 'filling in for the known caregivers who are already filling in for parents'.
Category = Quality
Who Needs Parents?
The Effects of Childcare and Early Education on Children in Britain and the USA, by Patricia Morgan, October 1996, p 5
2
In Britain, most workers in local authority and, increasingly in nurseries have a Nursery Nurse Examination Board (NNEB) qualification, a two-year course for which there are no entrance requirements. Most students start this at 16 and qualify at 18. It is within easy reach of low ability girls.
...Most childminders* have no training at all, although an increasing number of local authorities offer short courses.
However, this is superior to the situation in other parts of the European Union where, despite all the claims about the fabulous childcare on tap (there) it is uncommon for staff to have any qualifications at all.
*Childminder-  British term referring to a person, usually a woman, whose job is to take care of other people's children in her own home.
Category = Quality
Who Needs Parents?
The Effects of Childcare and Early Education on Children in Britain and the USA, by Patricia Morgan, October 1996, p 5
2
(In Britain) Private nurseries (daycares) must be registered and are inspected (infrequently) by local authority social services departments. These set their own standards guided by recommendations in the Children Act 1989.
Complaints that local authorities have been taking the (child/staff ratio) recommendations to heart and impeding the growth of childcare have resulted in central government requesting that these be interpreted more flexibly (in effect, taken less seriously) and supervised more lightly.
Category = Regulation

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Quotes from books about daycare - 1995-99, p17

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Last updated:  02/27/2008

Books:  1970 | 1980-1984 | 1985-1989 | 1990-1994 | 1995-1999 | 2000-2002 | 2003-2004 | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010


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