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Quotes from books about daycare - 1985-1989, p 26

 
Featured Books 1985-1989:  
Who Will Rock the Cradle   pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14  
Day Care Child Psychology & Adult Economics   pages: 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21
A Mother's Work  pages: 22 | 23 | 24
High Risk: children without a conscience pages: 25 | 26
Books from: 1970  |  1980-1984  |  1985-1989 |  1990-1994  |  1995-1999  |  2000-2002  |  2003-2004  |  2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 |
High Risk: children without a conscience
 by Dr. Ken Magid & Carole A. McKelvey
1987, P13
0
Few would debate the almost mystical significance of the mother-infant bond. Research from many fields, including psychiatry, child psychology, ethnology and from studies of other animal species, has confirmed our intuitive respect for mother-infant attachment. Studies cited previously in this book show that the first two years of a baby's life are when that bond forms. It is our opinion that parents of small infants must proceed with extreme caution when they are considering turning care of their baby over to someone else (i.e. daycare) ... These are the most important moments of your baby's life.
Category = Behavior
High Risk: children without a conscience
 by Dr. Ken Magid & Carole A. McKelvey
1987, P133
...experts are noticing an unfortunate and disturbing trend as they look at younger children in day care. These children appear to be more aggressive than other children.
A study recently completed by Alison Clarke-Stewart, a psychology professor at the University of California at Irvine, found "They tend to be more aggressive with other kids and assertive in general. They're less compliant--even with their parents. That's the price you pay."
Dr. Ron Haskens of the University of North Carolina found similar results on the trend toward more aggressive children. "On balance," he concludes, "there is reason for concern about the effects of day care on social development." He found that group day care is associated with increased levels of aggression and resistance to adult authority.
Category = Behavior
High Risk: children without a conscience
 by Dr. Ken Magid & Carole A. McKelvey
1987, P134
"Put simply, after more than 20 years of research on how children develop well, I would not think of putting a child of my own into any substitute care program on a full-time basis, especially a center-based program," (Burton) White says.
Category = Development, Quality
High Risk: children without a conscience
 by Dr. Ken Magid & Carole A. McKelvey
1987, P
282
...how can parents safely leave their children in the care of others without risking the disruptions that cause bonding breaks? We feel the answer to this question, for infants under 1 year of age, is that they cannot.
It is unwise to leave any youngster in full-time substitute care (daycare) until he is at least 1 year old.
Category = Behavior
 
High Risk: children without a conscience
 by Dr. Ken Magid & Carole A. McKelvey
1987, P
283
The least desirable (child care) situation for smaller children is a day-care center. Most centers have too many children and too few adults to be able to care for and nurture small children properly.
Category = Quality
High Risk: children without a conscience
 by Dr. Ken Magid & Carole A. McKelvey
1987, P
283
There is strong evidence that day-care centers, particularly with large numbers of children, can be damaging. A 1981 study by the Tavistock Institute, in England, found that such nurseries make children more aggressive and less able to cope with school.
Category = Behavior

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Quotes from books about daycare - 1985-1989, p 26

 

Last updated:  02/27/2008

Books:  1970 | 1980-1984 | 1985-1989 | 1990-1994 | 1995-1999 | 2000-2002 | 2003-2004 | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010


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